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Dragon Dictation for Authors

How this software can speed up your writing and help you avoid health issues

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Dragon Dictation – Is it Right for You?

By Trevor Douglas

About 15 years ago, while I was still working full-time as a business analyst, I contracted carpal tunnel syndrome from spending too much time typing on a keyboard. For any of you who are not familiar with the condition, it can be debilitating – a constant burning pain in your wrists and lower forearms that leaves you with a weak grip and unable to type for more than a few minutes without experiencing severe pain. Rest was suggested, as were exercises, as was an operation, but no medical physician was prepared to offer any guarantee of a complete cure.

[Note from Nick: another author’s tips on how to deal with similar health issues can be found in our previous article right here]

As an IT professional, my working life depended on being able to use a keyboard. My disability left me with few options for staying in the IT industry and I began to ponder a career change and a job that didn’t require typing. A work colleague suggested I try Dragon Dictate (Dragon) voice recognition software.

 

 

He’d never used it…

…but had heard good things about it and suggested it might be worth a try considering my career was at a crossroad. At that point, I didn’t have much to lose, so I shelled out two hundred dollars for the software and a decent microphone and got to work learning about this new technology. To my surprise, the results were reasonable after only two hours of basic training and I had new hope my career might be salvageable.

The software needed to learn how I speak (I’m Australian and speak with a twang), and I was worried this might be a challenge. But I persisted and after two weeks of using Dragon on a daily basis, my work output was more than double my best day on a keyboard.

With my IT career back in business, I was hooked on the productivity benefits of Dragon and never looked back. I became somewhat of an evangelist for the product, but very few of my colleagues made the switch to Dragon, even though they could see my typing output was double and sometimes triple what they could produce in an equivalent timeframe.

 

 

I’ve often wondered why that was.

Perhaps it was the expense? Or the time you needed to invest in training the software? Or the lack of a real medical condition like I had that was forcing a change? Whatever the reason, the number of ‘converts’ I had to Dragon over the next 15 years could be counted on two hands.

When I moved into writing fiction, it was a ‘no-brainer’ for me to continue using the software. The process wasn’t quite as ‘seamless’ as I had expected. It turns out that writing fiction is a different proposition to writing IT documentation, but after several weeks of trial and error, I was consistently turning out 2,000-word first-draft chapters for my new novel in under an hour.

Over the years, I’ve posted answers to a wide variety of questions writers have on Dragon. In this article, I summarise my experience as a writer with the product and answer the most common of these recurring questions to help you decide if Dragon is right for you.

 

 

Do you need Dragon Dictate software or will any speech recognition software do?

If you’re serious about productivity improvements for your writing, Dragon Dictate is the only product (in my opinion) you should consider. While there are a few free voice dictation products available on the web, they are very limited in the functions they provide and require you to speak slowly to get any sort of accuracy in translation.

With Dragon, provided you are using a decent microphone, it is possible to speak at normal conversational speed and expect 98 – 99% accuracy after training. Additionally, Dragon has the ability to learn unique words (very important for writers) and adapt its ‘voice engine’ to the way you speak.  

Microsoft Word and Google Docs now both incorporate dictation tools as part of their feature sets. They are a little better than the free online tools, but still a long way short of Dragon’s offering both in terms of accuracy, features and their ability to adapt to your speech.

 

 

What if I can’t afford to buy the product?

Some authors have lamented they are not in a financial position to buy Dragon, or that they don’t want to take a risk spending lots of money on a product they’re not sure will work for them. If this is the case and you’re a Windows user, it might be worthwhile trying to locate a second-hand version of the software from eBay or similar. The older versions may not have all the new features, but they are still quite good.  

Tip: go online and check which versions of Dragon will operate with your version of Windows before you commit to purchase any second-hand version of the software. If you are an Apple Mac user, you are, unfortunately, stuck with buying the latest version of the product (version 6) as the older versions of the product are simply not worth the money – even second hand.

Can you use Dragon with Scrivener?

Yes, you can use Dragon with Scrivener and most other common word processing systems. Most of Dragon’s command set to correct errors and edit your work will work fine with products like Scrivener. If you are using a product that doesn’t support Dragon’s full feature set, you can use Dragon’s built-in ‘DragonPad’ for dictation and simply copy and paste blocks of text as they are completed into your favorite word processing product.

 

 

What is the best way to use Dragon for writing?

I’ve found Dragon most effective for writing first drafts of each chapter of my novels. As mentioned, I can usually dictate the first draft of a chapter in under an hour.

While Dragon supports the ability to add all kinds of punctuation marks, I generally limit my use of punctuation in the first draft to simply adding full stops, commas, and paragraph marks. This allows me to concentrate on getting the first draft out quickly without distraction. I use the second and third chapter edits to add the correct punctuation when I’m well and truly in ‘review’ mode.

 

 

How important is a good microphone headset? Will any headset do?

A good microphone headset is essential. Trying to use a cheap headset as a shortcut to keep costs down, rarely works. Dragon is reliant on high-quality audio input, preferably without background noise to work effectively. I’m currently using a Jabra Evolve and getting great results, but in the past, I’ve used headsets from Philips and Andrea with great effect.

The brand of headset doesn’t seem to be as important as the quality of the device. I’ve never had a problem with any headset that I’ve spent $100 or more on and I think if you’re spending much less, you risk getting poor results.

It’s worth noting also that unless you have a specific need for a Bluetooth headset, my recommendation is to stick with headsets that connect to your computer via a USB port. Over the years, I’ve tried two Bluetooth headsets (both with price tags up around $200) and have had mixed results. I’ve checked out a few online forums which suggest Bluetooth microphones can be problematic with Dragon.

 

 

Is Dragon any good for transcription?

The notion of being able to dictate into a voice recorder while you are driving or out walking the dog and then upload it to Dragon to convert to text when you get home has a certain appeal to it. I quickly gave up on trying to dictate into a voice recorder while driving because it was simply too dangerous! I’ve also experimented with trying to dictate while out on walks and found this to be more successful, but still far from optimal.

As a writer and regardless of whether I’m using a microphone or a keyboard, I’ve found I work best in a quiet place free from distractions.  I’ve all but given up on the idea of recording chapter drafts while I’m exercising or doing some other activity because it simply doesn’t work for me. I’ve heard some authors have had success transcribing while they walk or exercise and they now incorporate it into their daily routine, but I think they are probably in the minority.

I now use my ‘walking time’ only for listening to podcasts and leave the writing until I’m alone in my office. That said, just because it doesn’t work for me doesn’t mean it won’t work for you and it’s worth experimenting with if you buy the product.

Tip: you don’t need to buy a special-purpose dictaphone as Dragon will accurately translate dictation from most modern smartphones.

 

 

What is the biggest challenge with using the product?

The biggest challenge is having the patience to work with the product for several weeks while it adjusts to your voice and speech patterns. A simple five or ten minute trial of the product won’t provide you with the results you need to assess its real capability.

Once over the training “hump” and the initial awkwardness of using a microphone rather than a keyboard for your writing, most authors who try Dragon never look back. One of the biggest challenges authors face, particularly if you’re looking to turn out multiple books each year, is getting enough quality time to write. While Dragon can’t put more hours into your day, it can certainly help maximize your productivity in the hours you have.

 

 

Do you have any other tips for using Dragon?

The biggest tip I can give writers, apart from limiting the use of punctuation in the first draft, is learning how to speak in full sentences. Dragon is very accurate when you speak in complete sentences, but less accurate when you pause while you are thinking about what you want to say next. Once you’ve mastered the art (and it does take a while) of holding a sentence in your head until its complete before you dictate, you will be well on your way to getting the most out of the software.

I’ve also found it very useful to have a bullet point outline of each chapter before I dictate. I find this immensely helpful in organizing my thought processes and I have far less of those awkward moments where I silently sit and think, ‘Okay, now the microphone is on, what am I going to say?’

I’ve noticed some writers comment that their writing style changes when they move from a keyboard to a microphone. While I think this is true for beginners, the more practiced you become with using Dragon, the more your writing style with a microphone will mirror your style with a keyboard.

My final tip is to use Dragon for what its really good at – rapidly inputting text for your first draft.  While it may not help you write a better novel, it will certainly reduce the time it takes to complete your writing project and that alone makes it worth considering.

 

Trevor Douglas is the author of four novels and one novella. He is currently writing (with the aid of Dragon) Cold Hard Cash, the third book in the Bridgette Cash Mystery Triller series. His website is www.trevordouglasauthor.com

 

And now we want to hear from you: Have you used dictation software in your writing? Are you planning to give it a try? Let us know your experiences in the comments!

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Kris B.
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Kris B.

Thanks, Trevor. This was my experience, too. I have a degenerative joint disease and am prone to RSIs. I wouldn’t be half as productive without Dragon and my digital voice recorder. It’s worth taking the time to teach Dragon and train one’s brain to speak the story.

Nick Stephenson
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Nick Stephenson

Thanks Kris! (PS dictaphone + transcription for the win)

Kris B.
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Kris B.

Thanks, Trevor. This was my experience, too. I have a degenerative joint disease and am prone to RSIs. I wouldn’t be half as productive without Dragon and my digital voice recorder. It’s worth taking the time to teach Dragon and train one’s brain to speak the story.

Perry
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Perry

Hi, Nick. I use it occasionally. I wanted to be ready in case I needed to be hands free for some reason. The microphone does make a big difference. I got one that is used for call centers and it made the accuracy much higher. It also only has the earmuff on one side which is nice when it’s hot out and you don’t want to boil your brain. My tip is to train the program for words you use frequently and read through the section after you have dictated to make the corrections while they are fresh in your… Read more »

Perry
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Perry

Hi, Nick. I use it occasionally. I wanted to be ready in case I needed to be hands free for some reason. The microphone does make a big difference. I got one that is used for call centers and it made the accuracy much higher. It also only has the earmuff on one side which is nice when it’s hot out and you don’t want to boil your brain. My tip is to train the program for words you use frequently and read through the section after you have dictated to make the corrections while they are fresh in your… Read more »

Mary Schiller
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Mary Schiller

Thanks for this article. I use Dragon daily for dictation and transcription. Right now I’m using it for nonfiction books, articles, online courses, you name it. I transcribe almost every talk I give, including FB Lives, webinars, even Zoom calls if I feel there is something in there that I might want for a book or other materials. I’ve only used it for nonfiction so far, but I’m rewriting a novel and plan to use Dragon for this version of the novel. It’s written in present tense, first person, so I think dictation might work well.

Mary Schiller
Guest
Mary Schiller

Thanks for this article. I use Dragon daily for dictation and transcription. Right now I’m using it for nonfiction books, articles, online courses, you name it. I transcribe almost every talk I give, including FB Lives, webinars, even Zoom calls if I feel there is something in there that I might want for a book or other materials. I’ve only used it for nonfiction so far, but I’m rewriting a novel and plan to use Dragon for this version of the novel. It’s written in present tense, first person, so I think dictation might work well.

Jeremy M.
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Jeremy M.

I tried it out to boost my speed, and it works fantastically well for this. At less than $40 for Dragon 13 Pro on Amazon, I couldn’t afford not to try it, and it easily doubled my speed. I also found my carpal tunnel issues don’t act up nearly as much when I use Dragon! One of the best ways to speed up its “training” is to use *your own writing* when you do the initial setup and it asks you to read material. You aren’t required to use the text they provide! Wonderful discovery 🙂 After using it for… Read more »

Jeremy M.
Guest
Jeremy M.

I tried it out to boost my speed, and it works fantastically well for this. At less than $40 for Dragon 13 Pro on Amazon, I couldn’t afford not to try it, and it easily doubled my speed. I also found my carpal tunnel issues don’t act up nearly as much when I use Dragon! One of the best ways to speed up its “training” is to use *your own writing* when you do the initial setup and it asks you to read material. You aren’t required to use the text they provide! Wonderful discovery 🙂 After using it for… Read more »

Thom Reece
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Thom Reece

I love the idea of using Dragon and have considered it for several years… but always ran into stumbling blocks conjured up in my own mind. Trevor’s article is a breath of fresh air and I appreciate you posting it. I have some serious heart issues and sitting at a computer typing has become a problem… but I find myself speaking whole paragraphs away from the computer… so why not Dragon? You have opened a doorway forward for me… Thanks.

Thom Reece
Guest
Thom Reece

I love the idea of using Dragon and have considered it for several years… but always ran into stumbling blocks conjured up in my own mind. Trevor’s article is a breath of fresh air and I appreciate you posting it. I have some serious heart issues and sitting at a computer typing has become a problem… but I find myself speaking whole paragraphs away from the computer… so why not Dragon? You have opened a doorway forward for me… Thanks.

Matthew Thrush
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Matthew Thrush

I use Dragon as well. The biggest issue that I have is having a clear mind. Meaning, if I’m exhausted or have a migraine, then dictating is severely more difficult to keep a clear mind and figure out what to say. But it’s the same with typing. If you’re too tired, hungry, or sick, then your creative juices are hampered. However, even if that’s the case, I still can output twice the amount of words that I could even at my best for typing. This is how I was able to go from writing an average of 1500 to 2000… Read more »

Matthew Thrush
Guest
Matthew Thrush

I use Dragon as well. The biggest issue that I have is having a clear mind. Meaning, if I’m exhausted or have a migraine, then dictating is severely more difficult to keep a clear mind and figure out what to say. But it’s the same with typing. If you’re too tired, hungry, or sick, then your creative juices are hampered. However, even if that’s the case, I still can output twice the amount of words that I could even at my best for typing. This is how I was able to go from writing an average of 1500 to 2000… Read more »

Eric
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Eric

YES! I’m using GoogleDocs/googleVoice – their AI is getting better and better AND now you can even use them offline. I have not tried Dragon, but can imagine it is better (?) e.g. with googledocs when you say “period” it will often type “.” and then change it retroactively to “period” – annoying. But I am “writing” over 80% of my books now with GoogleVoice – writer’s block GONE.

Eric
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Eric

YES! I’m using GoogleDocs/googleVoice – their AI is getting better and better AND now you can even use them offline. I have not tried Dragon, but can imagine it is better (?) e.g. with googledocs when you say “period” it will often type “.” and then change it retroactively to “period” – annoying. But I am “writing” over 80% of my books now with GoogleVoice – writer’s block GONE.

Michael Carney
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Michael Carney

I bought Dragon originally for my wife about seven years ago, because she is not really very good on technology and I thought it would help her with e-mails and letters. No such luck. All too technical for her, so the software stayed on a shelf for a year then I decided to try it out myself. At first, I only used the software when I was quoting from a book or magazine for an article, and didn’t want to retype the words. After that I graduated to using it for writing longer copy content. Nowadays, I use it for… Read more »

Michael Carney
Guest
Michael Carney

I bought Dragon originally for my wife about seven years ago, because she is not really very good on technology and I thought it would help her with e-mails and letters. No such luck. All too technical for her, so the software stayed on a shelf for a year then I decided to try it out myself. At first, I only used the software when I was quoting from a book or magazine for an article, and didn’t want to retype the words. After that I graduated to using it for writing longer copy content. Nowadays, I use it for… Read more »

Wendy
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Wendy

I’ve tried dragon off and on for several years.I’d say it’s about 80% accurate with me, even after several hours of training. That means I’m correcting one word in five. (When I’m not laughing so hard at its mishearings that I’m not working.) I actually calculated the overall speed: though I could dictate to it at 95 wpm, by the time I finished fixing all the mistranscriptions, it averaged out to 20 wpm–or about the same speed as I can type-transcribe. (If I’m word-generating, rather than copying handwriting, which I’ve spent most of the last year doing, I can type… Read more »

Wendy
Guest
Wendy

I’ve tried dragon off and on for several years.I’d say it’s about 80% accurate with me, even after several hours of training. That means I’m correcting one word in five. (When I’m not laughing so hard at its mishearings that I’m not working.) I actually calculated the overall speed: though I could dictate to it at 95 wpm, by the time I finished fixing all the mistranscriptions, it averaged out to 20 wpm–or about the same speed as I can type-transcribe. (If I’m word-generating, rather than copying handwriting, which I’ve spent most of the last year doing, I can type… Read more »

Jeannie Collins Beaudin
Guest
Jeannie Collins Beaudin

I’ve used dictation on and off since the 90’s with several different programs including Dragon, Microsoft and Mac to write reports and articles. All worked fine once you got them trained. It helps a lot to have documents you’ve written on your hard drive which seem to help in the training. Unfortunately a computer crash can wipe out your “training” files, forcing you to start over unless they’re stored online…so disheartening! But dictating is unbelievably faster with much less effort – worth the work to get it up and running.

Jeannie Collins Beaudin
Guest
Jeannie Collins Beaudin

I’ve used dictation on and off since the 90’s with several different programs including Dragon, Microsoft and Mac to write reports and articles. All worked fine once you got them trained. It helps a lot to have documents you’ve written on your hard drive which seem to help in the training. Unfortunately a computer crash can wipe out your “training” files, forcing you to start over unless they’re stored online…so disheartening! But dictating is unbelievably faster with much less effort – worth the work to get it up and running.

Peter Taylor
Guest
Peter Taylor

This article is interesting but appears old. It mentions Dragon 6. Dragon is now up to Version 15 which has ‘deep learning’ for the first time. A YouTube of this Professional Individual 15 shows extremely high accuracy straight out of the box with no learning time. Its accuracy will improve even further with use. The licence is fairly expensive (I’ve not bought yet but am seriously tempted) but it does give you 4 downloads to laptop and desktop and to save in case you replace a computer town the track. I have read that it only works for your voice,… Read more »

Jeremy M.
Guest
Jeremy M.

Dragon 15 Pro is about $40 on Amazon if you look hard enough. (Don’t get Home — Pro has the transcription option while Home does not). It’s the same thing as Dragon 15, essentially, though without 15’s “deep learning.” For me, I had 98% accuracy out of the box, and I’m at 99% now. I don’t bother training it to learn weird names in my books, I just use “John” or “Mary,” etc and global search/replace later. You’ll need at least a $40 desktop USB mic, which is what I use, but I do want to get the $120+ USB… Read more »

Peter Taylor
Guest
Peter Taylor

This article is interesting but appears old. It mentions Dragon 6. Dragon is now up to Version 15 which has ‘deep learning’ for the first time. A YouTube of this Professional Individual 15 shows extremely high accuracy straight out of the box with no learning time. Its accuracy will improve even further with use. The licence is fairly expensive (I’ve not bought yet but am seriously tempted) but it does give you 4 downloads to laptop and desktop and to save in case you replace a computer town the track. I have read that it only works for your voice,… Read more »

Connie Dowell
Guest
Connie Dowell

I use dictation on my smartphone all the time. It’s been a lifesaver for productivity as I’m getting back into writing and my business after having my babies. Not being tied to a keyboard means I can write in the park or as I’m doing right now in a parked car because my kids fell asleep and I get a moment alone with a coffee. It’s also great for times around the house when the toddlers are just playing but I know the site of a keyboard will attract little hands. For those of you who dictate into smartphones and… Read more »

Connie Dowell
Guest
Connie Dowell

I use dictation on my smartphone all the time. It’s been a lifesaver for productivity as I’m getting back into writing and my business after having my babies. Not being tied to a keyboard means I can write in the park or as I’m doing right now in a parked car because my kids fell asleep and I get a moment alone with a coffee. It’s also great for times around the house when the toddlers are just playing but I know the site of a keyboard will attract little hands. For those of you who dictate into smartphones and… Read more »

Ilona Rapp gmail
Guest
Ilona Rapp gmail

Hi Trevor. Thanks for sharing your process. I would love to dictate creatively with Dragon, or Dragon Anywhere, and I have tried, but for me, this use remains elusive. Dictating observations, or reading handwritten notes/letters etc is the limit of my achievements. For me, there’s the expectant silence which seems to consume every thought in my mind. I falter and lose my intent, as well as the visceral involvement with my imaginary scene. It’s as if my mind can’t fashion sentences and listen to my character’s voices at the same time. Also, I enjoy music while a write, and even… Read more »

Ilona Rapp
Guest
Ilona Rapp

Hi Connie. I use Dragon Anywhere. It is a monthly subscription service, and while It is pricey, it is worth the cost IMHO. For myself, I justify the expense by using it to record detailed observations of musculoskeletal exams for patient care. There is no training involved, and it does seem to have some intelligence, as accuracy is pretty high… I found it to be significantly more accurate than my Dragon 6 for Mac, and to have much fewer glitches. You need to be connected to wifi or wireless for it to work, however. The main differences between Dragon Anywhere… Read more »

Kimberly
Guest
Kimberly

I use Dragon Anywhere I love it! An injury left me without the use of my left hand. With Dragon Anywhere and Scrivener for IOS I can continue my author career.

Michael Sirois
Guest
Michael Sirois

I’ve used Dragon for years now (I’m up to Version 15 Pro). During NaNoWriMo each year I was faced with a minor dilemma. A few times a week some of us would meet at local coffee shops, cafes, or bars for a few hours and write in groups. All of those venues are noisy (from mildly so to horrendously loud) so Dragon is useless under those circumstances. Houston, where I live, is quite large (forty miles across, about the same size as London), so it can often take an hour to get somewhere. I skipped some of those write-ins occasionally… Read more »

Alan
Guest
Alan

Interview recordings using Dragon
A slow solution but at least it gets the whole interview (interviewer and interviewee) is to listen to the interview recording with your earphones and simultaneously repeat each sentence – preceded with you sating who is speaking (or do that via keyboard later) into Dragon.
Slow but still avoids most of the typing
Or you could separately read out just the interviewer’s spoken sentences and then after that just the interiewee’s spoken sentences – and then cut and past them into a single document via the keyboard.

Michael Sirois
Guest
Michael Sirois

I’ve used Dragon for years now (I’m up to Version 15 Pro). During NaNoWriMo each year I was faced with a minor dilemma. A few times a week some of us would meet at local coffee shops, cafes, or bars for a few hours and write in groups. All of those venues are noisy (from mildly so to horrendously loud) so Dragon is useless under those circumstances. Houston, where I live, is quite large (forty miles across, about the same size as London), so it can often take an hour to get somewhere. I skipped some of those write-ins occasionally… Read more »

Jenn
Guest
Jenn

I’ve heard that the PC version is far superior to the Mac version. I usually write on my Mac and just bought Scrivener for Mac, but I do have a PC desktop that I use for business programs. Should I purchase the PC version, use the PC desktop for dictating/transcribing and then transfer that over to Scrivener/Word on my Mac?
Thanks,
Jenn

Rory Marron
Guest
Rory Marron

I’m a Mac user but I got Dragon 13 Pro (Windows). I run Windows 10 on Mac through Parallels. It works flawlessly. Dragon 13 Home Pro edition was 39 dollars on Amazon US, Parallels 12 was £30 and Windows 10 ( developer’s) edition on eBay was cheap. In total far cheaper than the Mac version.

Jenn
Guest
Jenn

I’ve heard that the PC version is far superior to the Mac version. I usually write on my Mac and just bought Scrivener for Mac, but I do have a PC desktop that I use for business programs. Should I purchase the PC version, use the PC desktop for dictating/transcribing and then transfer that over to Scrivener/Word on my Mac?
Thanks,
Jenn

Catherine Walker
Guest
Catherine Walker

I bought it but haven’t used it since my second attempt. I have the Mac version. For such an expensive program it seems to be filled with bugs. At one point it deleted 3 paragraphs then started filling the page with symbols…. even after I pulled the plug on the microphone. I had to end up force quitting the program to get it to stop. I might dust it off and give it another go but only with a blank page. At least, Scrivener, has the fail-safe of everything being broken into scene’s on their own little doc’s so the… Read more »

Catherine Walker
Guest
Catherine Walker

I bought it but haven’t used it since my second attempt. I have the Mac version. For such an expensive program it seems to be filled with bugs. At one point it deleted 3 paragraphs then started filling the page with symbols…. even after I pulled the plug on the microphone. I had to end up force quitting the program to get it to stop. I might dust it off and give it another go but only with a blank page. At least, Scrivener, has the fail-safe of everything being broken into scene’s on their own little doc’s so the… Read more »

David Robinson
Guest
David Robinson

I suffer from severe arthritis which has got worse over the last few years, and my typing has deteriorated along with my joints. My son-in-law sent me an old version of Dragon earlier this year which I use with Windows 7 and Microsoft Word (I used to teach Word, so I’ve always preferred it). The difference is astounding. I write fiction and cynical, third age humour, and not only has my output gone up to an average of 3000 to 4000 words a day, but the accuracy has improved, much to the relief of my editor. Dragon has some quirks… Read more »

David Robinson
Guest
David Robinson

I suffer from severe arthritis which has got worse over the last few years, and my typing has deteriorated along with my joints. My son-in-law sent me an old version of Dragon earlier this year which I use with Windows 7 and Microsoft Word (I used to teach Word, so I’ve always preferred it). The difference is astounding. I write fiction and cynical, third age humour, and not only has my output gone up to an average of 3000 to 4000 words a day, but the accuracy has improved, much to the relief of my editor. Dragon has some quirks… Read more »

Bronwyn
Guest
Bronwyn

I have the same question as Jenn with regards to Dragon for PC being better than for Mac – any comments on that? Also, when you say your wpm increased, I am assuming this is just the words you get down on paper – not the time it takes to edit what Dragon put there and add the punctuation? If so, what would you say your wpm count would be adjusted for after factoring in time for editing? Thanks:-)

Bronwyn
Guest
Bronwyn

I have the same question as Jenn with regards to Dragon for PC being better than for Mac – any comments on that? Also, when you say your wpm increased, I am assuming this is just the words you get down on paper – not the time it takes to edit what Dragon put there and add the punctuation? If so, what would you say your wpm count would be adjusted for after factoring in time for editing? Thanks:-)

Anika
Guest
Anika

I wouldn’t recommend buying a second hand version of Dragon, there are too many dodgy sellers out there who will sell you a bootlegged copy. If you can’t afford the latest version of Dragon then have a look at the previous version, or the one before that. You can usually find them new on Amazon or other retailers significantly cheaper. If you check the specs you can see what has changed. Nuance usually has a comparison chart on their website. The thing about buying a new older version is you can register it and you will get the cheap upgrade… Read more »

Anika
Guest
Anika

I wouldn’t recommend buying a second hand version of Dragon, there are too many dodgy sellers out there who will sell you a bootlegged copy. If you can’t afford the latest version of Dragon then have a look at the previous version, or the one before that. You can usually find them new on Amazon or other retailers significantly cheaper. If you check the specs you can see what has changed. Nuance usually has a comparison chart on their website. The thing about buying a new older version is you can register it and you will get the cheap upgrade… Read more »

Kelly
Guest
Kelly

I have rwcen5been strugglong with muscle tension issues from spending hours at my laptop. This article has been very informative. Thanks. I’m definitely going to check into getting the Dragon program.

Kelly
Guest
Kelly

I have rwcen5been strugglong with muscle tension issues from spending hours at my laptop. This article has been very informative. Thanks. I’m definitely going to check into getting the Dragon program.

Jeff Adams
Guest
Jeff Adams

I’ve been using Dragon since August and I’m currently dictating my third novel with it. It’s been a great tool to increase my word count, which is critical since I have a day job too. Once I got into the flow of dictation my word count went up from typing 650 words on average in 20 minutes to dictating an average of 1100. My biggest challenge is making sure I speak clearly. I had no idea until Dragon how sloppy my diction was. I’ve primarily used dictation with an Olympus voice recorder. I don’t want to see the words on… Read more »

Jeff Adams
Guest
Jeff Adams

I’ve been using Dragon since August and I’m currently dictating my third novel with it. It’s been a great tool to increase my word count, which is critical since I have a day job too. Once I got into the flow of dictation my word count went up from typing 650 words on average in 20 minutes to dictating an average of 1100. My biggest challenge is making sure I speak clearly. I had no idea until Dragon how sloppy my diction was. I’ve primarily used dictation with an Olympus voice recorder. I don’t want to see the words on… Read more »

MLCoulthard
Guest
MLCoulthard

The first I ‘wrote’ using Dragon was a letter to my mom. Fascinating study in ‘self-amusement’. After the first year, I noticed I was not so much teaching Dragon how I speak. IT, was in fact, teaching ME how to enunciate properly. As a person that spoke publicly quite frequently, I found the longer I used Dragon, the more compliments I received on my speeches. Nice. Now, some untold years later, I still use Dragon (installed on my old computer). I am over 97% word recognition at conversational speeds. Nice! However, as my life has changed, so has my writing.… Read more »

MLCoulthard
Guest
MLCoulthard

The first I ‘wrote’ using Dragon was a letter to my mom. Fascinating study in ‘self-amusement’. After the first year, I noticed I was not so much teaching Dragon how I speak. IT, was in fact, teaching ME how to enunciate properly. As a person that spoke publicly quite frequently, I found the longer I used Dragon, the more compliments I received on my speeches. Nice. Now, some untold years later, I still use Dragon (installed on my old computer). I am over 97% word recognition at conversational speeds. Nice! However, as my life has changed, so has my writing.… Read more »

Chris Taylor
Guest
Chris Taylor

I started using Dragon dictation software late last year after being told about it by some writing colleagues at a conference. I absolutely love it and can’t imagine ever going back to writing on the keyboard. I dictate into a hand held device and then have Dragon transcribe for me. I’m able to dictate while I’m waiting for my kids to have swimming lessons, music lessons, tutoring etc. This used to be wasted time. Now I can put out 1000-2000 words while I wait. Fantastic! The more you use the software, the more accurate it is. It has doubled my… Read more »

Chris Taylor
Guest
Chris Taylor

I started using Dragon dictation software late last year after being told about it by some writing colleagues at a conference. I absolutely love it and can’t imagine ever going back to writing on the keyboard. I dictate into a hand held device and then have Dragon transcribe for me. I’m able to dictate while I’m waiting for my kids to have swimming lessons, music lessons, tutoring etc. This used to be wasted time. Now I can put out 1000-2000 words while I wait. Fantastic! The more you use the software, the more accurate it is. It has doubled my… Read more »

Kathleen McCormick
Guest
Kathleen McCormick

Before addressing technical issues, I want to say that I am an extremely happy convert to dictation which I’ve been using often for the last year and a half. Like others, there is no question that word production per hour dramatically increases. And while it might take some time to get used to dictating, in fact, hearing your characters talk out loud (or think out loud) can make your tone and word choice more appropriate/distinctive to a particular character. So dictating can actually lead to better writing as well as faster writing. I have been dictating only first drafts and… Read more »

Kathleen McCormick
Guest
Kathleen McCormick

Before addressing technical issues, I want to say that I am an extremely happy convert to dictation which I’ve been using often for the last year and a half. Like others, there is no question that word production per hour dramatically increases. And while it might take some time to get used to dictating, in fact, hearing your characters talk out loud (or think out loud) can make your tone and word choice more appropriate/distinctive to a particular character. So dictating can actually lead to better writing as well as faster writing. I have been dictating only first drafts and… Read more »

Katharina Gerlach
Guest
Katharina Gerlach

I’ve been using Dragon consistently for translating my novels (from English, my second language, back into German, my mother tongue) and found it quite accurate. One problem I’m having though is that I cannot dictate when the family is around. It makes me feel awkward and I begin to stumble over words. I tried dictating in English but haven’t had much success with it yet, probably due to the fact that I’ve got a very strong Scottish accent. I might simply need more time to train the program.

Katharina Gerlach
Guest
Katharina Gerlach

I’ve been using Dragon consistently for translating my novels (from English, my second language, back into German, my mother tongue) and found it quite accurate. One problem I’m having though is that I cannot dictate when the family is around. It makes me feel awkward and I begin to stumble over words. I tried dictating in English but haven’t had much success with it yet, probably due to the fact that I’ve got a very strong Scottish accent. I might simply need more time to train the program.

Karen Guyler
Guest
Karen Guyler

Chronic RSI forced me into Dragon at work 4 years ago where it works really well in Windows. At home, on a Mac, not so much, crashing every fifteen minutes or so and taking the whole system down with it. I’ve heard that the new version of scrivener means that Dragon doesn’t do this so much so will be investing in that. There’s definitely a difference between thinking through your fingers and speaking though!

Karen Guyler
Guest
Karen Guyler

Chronic RSI forced me into Dragon at work 4 years ago where it works really well in Windows. At home, on a Mac, not so much, crashing every fifteen minutes or so and taking the whole system down with it. I’ve heard that the new version of scrivener means that Dragon doesn’t do this so much so will be investing in that. There’s definitely a difference between thinking through your fingers and speaking though!

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